Tag Archives: David Blight

Understanding History Through Addition, Not Subtraction, on Civil War Battlefields

Last Wednesday, I reported on a provision in the Department of the Interior’s 2021 spending bill that would, if approved by Congress and signed into law by the president, remove Confederate statues from national parks. “It’s a top priority of … Continue reading

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BookChat with Cody Marrs, author of Not Even Past

As a big fan of the Civil War in pop culture, I was especially looking forward to Cody Marrs’ new book Not Even Past: The Stories We Keep Telling About the Civil War, which deals with the ways “the story … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Civil War in Pop Culture, Lincoln, Memory, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Unintentional Reconciliation  – Memorializing the Cavalry Fight at Gettysburg

Though not far from the Civil War’s memorial epicenter, the cavalry battlefield at Gettysburg National Military Park sits relatively undisturbed by the crowds of tourists who come to see the site of the largest ever battle in the Western Hemisphere. … Continue reading

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Telling History vs. Making Art: The ways we remember the war

Part two in a series “We may say that only at the moment when Lee handed Grant his sword was the Confederacy born,” wrote Robert Penn Warren during the Civil War’s centennial; “or to state matters another way, in the … Continue reading

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Telling History vs. Making Art: “a tension between Art and Science”

Part one in a series As a battlefield guide at Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park (FSNMP), I frequently speak with folks who’ve come to the battlefields because they’ve read The Killer Angels, which in turn inspired them to come … Continue reading

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American Oracle and the dangers of political fanaticism

Reading David Blight’s American Oracle this weekend, I’ve noticed a subtle, cautionary note that keeps playing itself as an occasional undertone. It reminds me again why the study of history has something to tell us about current events—and also that no one … Continue reading

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Race and Reunion 10 Years Later: Restoring Reunion (Anew)

Final part in a series The contributions of David Blight’s Race and Reunion to the scholarship on Reconstruction and historical memory are undeniably some of the most valuable (and most-cited) in contemporary historiography on the American Civil War. Perhaps more … Continue reading

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Race and Reunion 10 Years Later: The PR Battles for Public Opinion and Memory

Part three in a series As a communications professor and former public relations guy, it’s hard for me to look at memory studies as anything but public relations cases. After all, public memory starts as public opinion, and public opinion … Continue reading

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Race & Reunion 10 Years Later: The Power of Interpretation and Explanation

Part two in a series Authored by James Broomall.   In thinking about David Blight’s sweeping study, Race and Reunion, I am drawn to its interpretive and explanatory powers, especially as a teaching instrument. In describing how Americans’ “remembered their … Continue reading

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Race and Reunion 10 Years Later: “Reconciliationist” Memory Trumps “Emancipationist” Memory

Part one in a series With a decade of perspective on which to draw, it’s clear that David Blight’s Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory (2001) represented both a culmination of and shift within Civil War memory … Continue reading

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