Tag Archives: George Gordon Meade

Halleck and Meade in the Days After Gettysburg

Making fun of Henry Halleck is almost a cottage industry unto itself. For instance, when I mention him in talks, I tend to point out that he looks like he spent the night on a park bench before shuffling into … Continue reading

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Meade: “A Great Deal Too Much Fuss”

On the afternoon of July 7, 1863, George Gordon Meade arrived in Frederick, Maryland, as his army marched in pursuit of the retreating Army of Northern Virginia. Word of his major victory at Gettysburg had already circulated widely, and Meade … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Campaigns, Leadership--Federal, Personalities, Primary Sources | Tagged , , , , , | 26 Comments

What if John Reynolds had not been killed at Gettysburg?

John Reynolds’s unexpected death on July 1, 1863, in the opening hours of America’s most famous battle, has elevated him to near-mythic stature. His fans are tantalized by the possibilities his survival might have offered (no less so than Stonewall … Continue reading

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Tardy Daniel Sickles and the First Slow Steps Toward Controversy

When people think of Dan Sickles at Gettysburg, the first thing that comes to mind is his ill-fated move toward the Peach Orchard on July 2. Ordered to hold a position that extended the Union line south from Cemetery Hill … Continue reading

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Stuart’s Big Capture and the Cost of Doing Business

Jeb Stuart, cut off from the Army of Northern Virginia’s infantry during the last days of June 1863, later tried to excuse his position by making much ado about his exploits. In particular, he crowed about a Federal wagon train … Continue reading

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Saving History Saturday: Myer’s Hill

On May 14, 1864, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant was moving the Union V and VI Crops from the right flank of the Army of the Potomac’s position in Spotsylvania, to the left flank. He was hoping to either attack … Continue reading

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Book Review: “Lee is Trapped, and Must be Taken: Eleven Fateful Days after Gettysburg: July 4 – 14, 1863”

Are we firmly in the golden age of Gettysburg publishing? The past 15 – 20 years have produced a wealth of essential Gettysburg reading for those of us interested in the climactic battle of the American Civil War. That’s not … Continue reading

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The Evolution of Cavalry Tactics: How Technology Drove Change (Part Six)

(part six in a series) In the previous installment of this series, we demonstrated how the advent of rifled muskets and rifled artillery made the Napoleonic cavalry charge obsolete. Now, we will examine how the evolution of the technology employed … Continue reading

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Deconstructing Meade’s Decision at Mine Run

On the morning of November 30, 1863, Gouverneur K. Warren awoke to a surprise. The evening before, he had positioned nearly half of the Army of the Potomac on the far Confederate right, poised for an attack at 8:00 the … Continue reading

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The Great Battle and the Ghosting of Meade

I love it when I get to see the new cover designs for books in the Emerging Civil War Series. The covers have become a distinctive part of our overall brand, tying the books together in a visually strong way … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War Series | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments