Tag Archives: J.E.B. Stuart

Fallen Leaders: Maine’s Hiram Berry

Haunted by a premonition, Maj. Gen. Hiram Berry recklessly exposed himself to Confederate snipers at Chancellorsville and paid the price for his carelessness. A 36-year-old Rockland (Maine) merchant in spring 1861, the physically robust Berry led the 4th Maine Infantry … Continue reading

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Stuart’s Promotion Prank

It’s pretty well documented that General J.E.B. Stuart liked to make jokes and play pranks on his peers and subordinates. Recently, I came across another one in the reminiscences of Thomas S. Garnett who served as a courier for the … Continue reading

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In Defense of Sheridan

Emerging Civil War welcomes back Nathan Provost. General Philip Sheridan was a hard man of war. He was egotistical and bold, and his personality traits negatively struck many officers, and later historians. In the last twenty years, Sheridan’s legacy has … Continue reading

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Give the Devil All He Wants: The 1862 Rebel Raid on Chambersburg

ECW welcomes guest authors Dan Masters and Scott Mingus Fear had long since given way to nonchalance. Constant alarms that “The Rebels are coming” had wearied the residents of Franklin County, Pennsylvania, to the point that by mid-October 1862, most … Continue reading

Posted in Cavalry, Primary Sources | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Brooklyn Firemen in Action in Maryland

Sarah Bierle’s post yesterday commemorating the sacrifices of New York City’s firemen past and present reminded me of a story I recently found about the firefighters of the 14th Brooklyn now turned soldiers in the Maryland Campaign. The regiment’s motto … Continue reading

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“To Make A Foray”: A Letter From The Chickahominy Raid

This week I’ve been getting my notes ready for the Virtual Symposium filming session where I’ll be sharing about J.E.B. Stuart’s 1862 Chambersburg Raid. In the process of reviewing the historical information, I moved backward on the timeline and re-examined … Continue reading

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Jubal Early’s Charmed Existence in the Summer of 1862

ECW welcomes guest author Chris Bryan Brigadier General Jubal Early, and his brigade, faced tight spots on numerous battlefields in August and September 1862. These events occurred during a period when the brigade also fought at Kettle Run, Groveton, and … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Leadership--Confederate | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Book Review: Custer’s Gray Rival

Biographies abound of the Confederacy’s more well-known cavalry officers, especially J. E. B. Stuart and Nathan Bedford Forrest. But similar works detailing the lives of the next tier of Confederate cavaliers are less easy to find. Sheridan R. Barringer’s Custer’s Gray … Continue reading

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December 20, 1861: The Battle of Dranesville and the Confederate Battle Flag’s Debut

On a chilly morning, four regiments of Confederate infantry started off from their camps near Centreville, Virginia. They accompanied a battery of four cannon, 150 cavalry troopers, somewhere between 200-400 wagons, and were led by Brig. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart. The … Continue reading

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“The Hand of a Master”: Confederate Artillery on the Left Flank at Antietam

By sunrise on September 17, 1862, the Confederate guns waited on the left flank. Ordered to guard “Stonewall” Jackson’s flank and use the high ground advantage to blast Union attackers, the assembled cannons and crews prepared for battle. General J. … Continue reading

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