Tag Archives: Joshua L. Chamberlain

General Joshua L. Chamberlain and a Fatherhood Journey

On October 18, 1864, Brigadier General Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain wrote a letter to his wife, Frances Caroline. This letter – though written during the war period – is unique and gives a glimpse of fatherhood, rather than war. Chamberlain is … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Leadership--Federal, Primary Sources | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Maine at War: A Conversation with Writer Brian Swartz (part four)

conclusion to a four-part series In wrapping up yesterday’s segment, Brian Swartz, author of the Maine at War blog, mentioned Tom Huntington’s new book, Maine Roads to Gettysburg. “He has done Maine history quite a service in articulating the stories … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Civilian, Common Soldier | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Garfield and Chamberlain

On June 14, 1881, Joshua L. Chamberlain of Brunswick, Maine, wrote a letter to President James A. Garfield.  The President’s wife, Lucretia Rudolph Garfield, had been ill with malaria for much of the spring, and Chamberlain offered this advice: It … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Federal, Personalities, Politics | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

“Something Abides”: Joshua L. Chamberlain and Civil War Memory

As it was for millions of his generation, the Civil War was the defining event of Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain’s life.  Veterans from both sides took understandable pride in their service, wrote their memoirs, and joined veterans’ organizations.  In all of … Continue reading

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Book Review: “Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the Petersburg Campaign: His Supposed Charge from Fort Hell, his Near-Mortal Wound, and a Civil War Myth Reconsidered”

To most of those who study the Civil War, the mention of Joshua L. Chamberlain conjures images of the 20th Maine’s stand atop Little Round Top at the Battle of Gettysburg. Chamberlain’s bayonet charge has certainly made him famous, but … Continue reading

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Don’t Give an Inch is “one big adrenaline rush”

Emerging Civil War’s latest book about Gettysburg tells the story of a battle hailed as “one, big adrenaline rush” by one of the book’s co-authors. Don’t Give An Inch: The Second Day At Gettysburg, July 2, 1863—from Little Round Top … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Emerging Civil War Series | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Presentations From the 2014 Emerging Civil War Symposium-Eric J. Wittenberg

As we gear up for this years Emerging Civil War Symposium at Stevenson Ridge, we wanted to share this presentation from last years ECW Symposium. As you may recall, we were honored to have C-SPAN cover our first major symposium. Below is … Continue reading

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Exciting Symposium Addition and Announcement

We are excited to announce that we have added author/historian Eric J. Wittenberg to our list of speakers for this years Second Annual Emerging Civil War Symposium at Stevenson Ridge. Eric’s topic will be “Joshua L. Chamberlain and Wade Hampton: … Continue reading

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The Battle of Lewis Farm, March 29, 1865

I’m no fan of Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain but I understand the appeal. His skillful mastery of controlling the narrative regarding his service in the war has made him a larger than life figure. The topic of his role at Gettysburg … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Leadership--Federal, Sesquicentennial | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

Telling History vs. Making Art: Killer Angels, real and fictional

Part five in a series. In my last post, I began to discuss Michael Shaara’s aesthetic choices for constructing The Killer Angels as he did, and how he adopted a Lost Cause-interpretation of Robert E. Lee as a central choice … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Memory, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments