Tag Archives: Photography

Elmer Ellsworth was NOT a Derp!!! (Well, maybe a little bit of a Derp . . . but he’s my Derp!)

As I grind through sourcing First Fallen this summer, which is insanely frustrating at times, I had to decide just what I could go dig into myself and what I might–yes–here it comes . . . need to hire a … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Civil War in Pop Culture, Common Soldier, Memory | Tagged , , , , , | 6 Comments

“Little Photography in Jeffdom:” The Decline of Photography in the Civil War South

In 1862 Humphrey’s Journal of the Daguerreotype and Photographic Arts boasted that “The Photographic Art down South has completely died out in consequence of the war.”[i] Though an obvious overstatement, considering that southern photographers operated throughout the war, the journal … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Civil War Events, Civilian, Common Soldier, Economics, Leadership--Confederate, Lincoln, Material Culture, Memory, Newspapers, Personalities, Photography, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Question of the Week: 3/21-3/27/16

This week’s Question of the Week comes from Phill Greenwalt, who asks, “Is photography one of the chief reasons the Civil War is more studied and familiar than the American Revolution?”

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Photography, Question of the Week, Revolutionary War | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

A View and A Memory

On a recent park training held in Harper’s Ferry, I had the chance, after class, to drive over to Antietam National Battlefield and walk the grounds as the sun set on a crisp autumn day. In fact, the training was … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Emerging Civil War, Memory, National Park Service | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Thomas Nast’s Divided Christmas

On this day in 1863 Thomas Nast’s Christmas Eve forced the readers of Harper’s Weekly to confront the hardships of a war-torn wintry season. Though drawn in 1862, the image occupied a double-page spread in the January 3, 1863 edition … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Common Soldier, Newspapers, Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Sailors, Slaves, and Henry P. Moore

While doing some research for an upcoming post, I came across several photographs by Henry P. Moore, a New Hampshire artist who traveled to South Carolina in 1862. Like many of his colleagues, Moore capitalized on the outbreak of the … Continue reading

Posted in Navies, Photography, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Weight of a Year

Working on the layout for Bert Dunkerly’s upcoming To the Bitter End, I was searching for a photo of President Lincoln from 1865. As I sorted through the Library of Congress’s stash, I came across a pair of photos taken … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War Series, Leadership--Federal, Personalities, Photography | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

I Wish I Had Been in the Case: Portrait Photography, Federal Soldiers, and the Home Circle (part two)

Today, we are pleased to welcome back guest author James Brookes. This is the second part of a two-part series. The mass transition of images between Federal soldiers and their home communities was entirely unprecedented. In February 1862, Humphrey’s Journal observed … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Common Soldier, Photography | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

I Wish I Had Been in the Case: Portrait Photography, Federal Soldiers, and the Home Circle (part one)

Today, we are pleased to welcome guest author James Brookes. This is the first of a two-part series. In April 1855, the English photographer Roger Fenton wrote to his wife from the Crimean Peninsula to update her on his progress … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Common Soldier, Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Give the Gift of War!

Almost everyone who reads this blog has some interest in the American Civil War, even if it is only that a household member is a Civil War buff. With the holidays upon us, ECW will offer a short series of … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Common Soldier, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments