Tag Archives: Vicksburg Campaign

Arkansas’s Role in the Vicksburg Campaign (part two)

ECW is pleased to welcome guest author Carson Butler. Part two of two. Following victory at Port Gibson, Grant pushed his forces north-eastward, and ultimately marched his army towards Jackson, the capital of Mississippi. After defeating a Confederate force under … Continue reading

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Arkansas’s Role in the Vicksburg Campaign (part one)

ECW is pleased to welcome guest author Carson Butler. Part one of two. The Mississippi River is one of the most defining features of the North American continent, and during the American Civil War, it proved to be vital in … Continue reading

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BookChat with Steven Woodworth and Charles Grear, editors of Vicksburg Besieged

I have been spending a lot of time lately with the latest volume in Southern Illinois University Press’s “Civil War Campaigns in the West” Series, Vicksburg Besieged, edited by Steven E. Woodworth and Charles D. Grear (see info on the … Continue reading

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Sherman’s “Demon Spirit”

In a letter written on April 29, 1863, to his wife Ellen, William T. Sherman privately expressed his misgivings about the Vicksburg campaign Ulysses S. Grant was just then launching. “My own opinion is that this whole plan of attack … Continue reading

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“You can do a great deal in eight days”: Ulysses S. Grant’s Forgotten Turning Point (part two)

Part two of two With an escort of twenty cavalrymen, Ulysses S. Grant rode on the evening of May 3, 1863, into the newly captured town Grand Gulf, Mississippi. He passed the now-abandoned Confederate forts, Cobun and Wade, and made … Continue reading

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“You can do a great deal in eight days”: Ulysses S. Grant’s Forgotten Turning Point (part one)

Part one of two Ulysses S. Grant had envisioned his arrival in Grand Gulf, Mississippi, under other circumstances. A week earlier, he had targeted the landing as the ideal spot to cross his army from the west bank of the … Continue reading

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“Praise the Lord and Admiral Porter”: Running the Vicksburg Batteries

“We still live,” wrote Lieutenant Elias Smith of the USS Lafayette. “The whole gunboat fleet passed the Vicksburg batteries on Thursday night [April 16, 1863], without receiving material damage. All praise to the Lord and Admiral Porter.” As far as … Continue reading

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Question of the Week: 6/15-6/21/2020

Last week’s question featured the Gettysburg Campaign, and we’re also in the Vicksburg Campaign/Siege season, so… In your opinion, what’s the key event of the Vicksburg campaign before July 4th?

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The Civil War and General Jim Mattis: A Closer Look at Call Sign Chaos (Part 1)

The first time I heard Jim Mattis speak was in 2007.  As an Education Director for the U.S. Marine Corps, I attended then Lieutenant General Mattis’ seminar on the 1st Marine Division at the First Battle of Fallujah (2003).  This … Continue reading

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Scenes from Vicksburg, Day 2 (part three)

part of a series We followed the route of Grant’s supply train from the Mississippi up toward the modern Raymond battlefield. One of the myth’s of the campaign is that Grant lived off the land, a la Sherman’s later March … Continue reading

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