Historic Scottsville, Virginia

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Downtown ScottsvilleCivil War Trails recently spent an afternoon in Central Virginia, including time in historic Scottsville. We can’t recommend spending an afternoon in this historic downtown enough. 

Scottsville MuseumSome sites we enjoyed include the Scottsville Museum, and the Hatton Ferry, which is the last pole-operated ferry in America.

Scottsville isn’t just about history though, the James River Brewery and several local outfitters make sure there is something here for everyone.

Scottsville is just one of the many charming and unique towns that we’ll bring you to if you chose to follow Civil War Trails.

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5 Responses to Historic Scottsville, Virginia

  1. John Pryor says:

    Will have to try it. My favorites are Lexington, Staunton and Culpeper.

    • John, if you plan ahead and double check the hours (and river height) to ensure everything is open you can spend a solid day in beautiful Scottsville. The brewery, ferry, museum, and walking tour are all worthwhile!

  2. The Hatton Ferry has a very interesting history. My family and I have visited numerous times.
    http://www.thehattonferry.org/

    Also, if you didn’t go to Lumpkin’s for a meal, you missed another great site in Scottsville!

  3. Derek Lankford says:

    I drive through this little town every time I head to and come back from Pennsylvania. Never seem to have time to stop and look around. I’ll have to do that soon.

  4. William C. White, Jr. says:

    My grandparents and my father grew up in Scottsville and the family home on the hill over looking Scottsville and the “ horseshoe” river bend and railroad that ran along the bend. I grew up with many stories about that beautiful town. True natives of Scottsville described the invasion of Scottsville by a union army the war of northern invasion and there wasn’t anything civil about it. My cousin Gordon and I would go downtown and sit down with the old black man who would tell us old Uncle Remus stories. The town plaque in the museum was originally made by my great-great ancestor from Scotland. I love that little town and the family reunions we had every year. We would go rafting down the James river with a local watermelon we would plug. Every one in the town knew each other like one big family.

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