Category Archives: Personalities

Year in Review 2017: #5

Lt. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson continues to fascinate historians and aficionados. One of the more interesting aspects of Jackson’s life are the horses he owned, especially Little Sorrel. 

Posted in Leadership--Confederate, Personalities, Year in Review | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Preservation News: June 1, 1864 at Cold Harbor

Recently the Civil War Trust announced an effort to preserve land related to the June 1, 1864 fighting at Cold Harbor. This combat has often been overshadowed by the Union assault which took place there on June 3. Cold Harbor … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Common Soldier, Leadership--Federal, Memory, Personalities, Preservation | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Finding Evander McIvor Law

My short odyssey to find a Confederate general’s grave in central Florida led me to learn something about my current state of residence and military history. This is part biography of Evandor McIvor Law and part travel-post. **************************************************** Born in … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Monuments, On Location, Personalities, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

From a Former Prisoner to Another: Brigadier General William Stephen Walker and the Roots of Reconciliation

Today, we are pleased to welcome back guest author Sean Michael Chick A wonderful example of the kind of empathy that helped to make reconciliation possible was the capture of Brigadier General William Stephen Walker in 1864. Walker was born … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Common Soldier, Leadership--Confederate, Memory, Personalities, Primary Sources | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

A Rebel’s Duty

While researching the Southern Historical Society Papers on another topic, I came across the following passage from 1907: When the question is asked what the followers of Lee and Jackson fought for, let the ringing, unchangeable and ever true response … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Navies, Personalities, Politics | Tagged , , , , | 14 Comments

The Woundings of Jackson and Longstreet

The circumstances were eerily similar: both Confederate lieutenant generals had led successful flank attacks through the dark, close woods of the Wilderness when they were accidentally shot by their own men. For both Stonewall Jackson and James Longstreet, it seemed … Continue reading

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A Poet’s Perspective: Herman Melville and the Civil War

It was November of 1860, and America had a new president. He was highly popular among the northern states, but he was widely disliked in the South. At the same time you have Herman Melville, famous for his 1851 novel … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Books & Authors, Civil War Events, Civilian, Emerging Civil War, Memory, Newspapers, Personalities, Ties to the War | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

One of Sherman’s Pioneers: The Story of Levi Lindsay

Born in Caton, NY, on November 15, 1839, Levi Lindsay was the second son of Allen Lindsay, Jr. (1810-1891) and Harriet Benson (1825-1860). He had four siblings: Horace (1837 – 1871), Charlotte (1844 – 1876), Hannah (1846 – 1860) and … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Common Soldier, Memory, Personalities | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Struck by a Fired Ramrod, Part 2: Mysterious Death and Elaborate Funeral

This is part two of a three-part series. Part one can be found here. Major William Ellis returned to the Army of the Potomac near Petersburg in mid-June. He knowingly cut short his recovery from a gruesome wound received from … Continue reading

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Struck by a Fired Ramrod, Part 1: Delayed Mortal Wounding at Spotsylvania’s Bloody Angle

“This has been a Sabbath to me,” confessed Surgeon George T. Stevens to his wife, Harriet, in a letter written Thursday evening, August 4, 1864. “No day since the campaign commenced last May has seemed like Sabbath before, but this … Continue reading

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