The Emerging Civil War Series

Recipient of the Army Historical Foundation’s Lieutenant General Richard G. Trefry Award for contributions to the literature on the history of the U.S. Army: “an invaluable collection of Civil War battlefield guides”

The authors of this Savas Beatie series continue to provide quality additions to the conflict’s literature.” — Civil War News

“The Emerging Civil War Series has been a pleasure to read since its inception . . . .” — Gettysburg Chronicle

The Civil War is America’s great story. We want to introduce as many people as possible to that history by telling the war’s many great stories in fresh new ways.

The Emerging Civil War Series, published by Savas Beatie LLC, offers compelling and easy-to-read overviews of some of the Civil War’s most important battles and issues. Each volume features more than a hundred-and-fifty photos and graphics, plus sharp new maps and visually engaging layouts.

To order any of these titles, visit their individual pages or the Savas Beatie website. Signed copies are available.

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The Aftermath of Battle: The Burial of the Civil War Dead
by Meg Groeling

Layout 1The clash of armies in the American Civil War left hundreds of thousands of men dead, wounded, or permanently damaged. Skirmished and battles could result in casualty numbers as low as one or two and as high as tens of thousands. The carnage of the battlefield left a lasting impression on those who experienced or viewed it, but in most cases the armies quickly moved on to meet again at another time and place. When the dust settled and the living armies moved on, what happened to the dead left behind.

Unlike battle narratives, The Aftermath of Battle: Burial of the Civil War Dead picks up the story as the battle ends.

Click here for more information.

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All the Fighting They Want: The Atlanta Campaign, from Peachtree Creek to the Surrender of the City, July 18-September 2, 1864
by Steve Davis

Layout 1John Bell Hood brought a hang-dog look and a hard-fighting spirit to the Army of Tennessee. Once one of the ablest division commanders in the Army of Northern Virginia, he found himself, by the spring of 1864, in the war’s Western Theater. Recently recovered from grievous wounds sustained at Chickamauga, he suddenly found himself thrust into command of the Confederacy’s ill-starred army even as Federals pounded on the door of the Deep South’s greatest untouched city, Atlanta.

The crisis could not have been more acute.

Click here for more information.

 

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Bloody Autumn: The Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864
by Daniel T. Davis and Phillip S. Greenwalt

Layout 1In the spring of 1862, a string of Confederate victories in the Valley had foiled Union plans in the state and kept Confederate armies fed and supplied. In 1863, the Army of Northern Virginia used the Valley as its avenue of invasion, culminating in the battle of Gettysburg. The Valley continued to offer Confederates an alluring backdoor to Washington D.C.

But when Sheridan returned to the Valley in 1864, the stakes jumped dramatically. To lose the Valley would mean to lose the state, Stonewall Jackson had once said—and now that prediction would be put to the test as Sheridan fought with Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early for possession.

For the North, the fragile momentum its war effort had gained by capturing Atlanta would quickly evaporate; for Abraham Lincoln, defeat in the Valley could very well mean defeat in the upcoming election. For the South, more than its breadbasket was at stake—its nascent nationhood lay on the line.

Click here for more information on Bloody Autumn

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Bushwhacking on a Grand Scale: The Battle of Chickamauga, Sept. 18-20, 1863
by William Lee White

Layout 1The battle of Chickamauga brought an early fall to the Georgia countryside in 1863, where men fell like autumn leaves.

The smoke of gunfire filled the vine-choked forest around Chickamauga Creek, making the already impenetrable landscape an impossible place for battle. Unable to see beyond their immediate surroundings, officers found it impossible to exercise effective command, and the engagement deteriorated into what many participants later called “a soldier’s battle.” It was, said Union Brigadier General John Turchin, “Bushwhacking on a Grand Scale.”

Click here for more info on Bushwhacking on a Grand Scale

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Calamity in Carolina: The Battles of Averasboro and Bentonville
by Daniel T. Davis and Phillip S. Greenwalt

Layout 1Robert E. Lee gave Joseph E. Johnston an impossible task.

Federal armies under Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman had rampaged through Georgia on their “March to the Sea,” and now were cutting a swath of destruction as they marched north from Savannah through the Carolinas. Locked in a desperate defense of Richmond and Petersburg, there was little Robert E. Lee could do to stem Sherman’s tide—so he turned to Joseph E. Johnston. And he gave Johnston an impossible task.

Click here for more information about Calamity in Carolina.

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Dawn of Victory: Breakthrough at Petersburg, March 25-April 1, 1865
by Edward S. Alexander

Layout 1After the unprecedented violence of the 1864 Overland Campaign, Union Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant turned his gaze south of Richmond to Petersburg, where the railroads that supplied the Confederate capital and its defenders found their junction. Nine grueling months of constant maneuver and combat around the “Cockade City” followed. Massive fortifications dominated the landscape, and both armies frequently pushed each other to the brink of disaster.

As March 1865 drew to a close, Grant planned one more charge against Confederate lines.

Click here for more information on Dawn of Victory.

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Don’t Give an Inch: The Second Day at Gettysburg, from Little Round Top to Cemetery Ridge, July 2, 1863
by Chris Mackowski, Kristopher D. White, and Daniel T. Davis

Layout 1July 2, 1863, was one of the Civil War’s bloodiest. With names that have become legendary—Little Round Top, Devil’s Den, the Peach Orchard, the Wheatfield—the second day at Gettysburg encompasses some of the best-known engagements of the Civil War—and the Pennsylvania landscape ran red as a result.

Click here for more information on Don’t Give an Inch.

 

 

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Fight Like the Devil: The First Day at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863
by Chris Mackowski, Kristopher D. White, and Daniel T. Davis

Layout 1Do not bring on a general engagement, Confederate General Robert E. Lee warned his commanders. The Army of Northern Virginia, slicing its way through south-central Pennsylvania, was too spread out, too vulnerable, for a full-scale engagement with its old nemesis, the Army of the Potomac. Too much was riding on this latest Confederate invasion of the North. Too much was at stake.

As Confederate forces groped their way through the mountain passes, a chance encounter with Federal cavalry on the outskirts of a small Pennsylvania crossroads town triggered a series of events that quickly escalated beyond Lee’s—or anyone’s—control. Waves of soldiers materialized on both sides in a constantly shifting jigsaw of combat. “You will have to fight like the devil . . .” one Union cavalryman predicted.

The costliest battle in the history of the North American continent had begun.

Click here for more information on Fight Like the Devil.

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Grant’s Last Battle: The Story Behind The Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant
by Chris Mackowski

Layout 1Facing financial ruin and struggling against terminal throat cancer, Ulysses S. Grant putting pen to paper for one final campaign: an effort to write his memoirs before he died.

Filled with personal intrigues of its own and supported by a cast of colorful characters that included Mark Twain, William Vanderbilt, and P. T. Barnum, Grant’s Last Battle recounts a deeply personal story as dramatic for Grant as any of his battlefield exploits. The Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant would cement his place as not only one of America’s greatest heroes but also as one of its most sublime literary voices.

Click here for more information about Grant’s Last Battle

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Hell Itself: The Battle of the Wilderness, May 5-7, 1864
by Chris Mackowski

Layout 1Soldiers called it one of the “waste places of nature” and “a region of gloom”—the Wilderness of Virginia, 70 square miles of dense, second-growth forest known as “the dark, close wood.”

“This, viewed as a battleground, was simply infernal,” a Union soldier later said. “A more unpromising theatre of war was never seen,” said another.

Yet here, in the spring of 1864, the Civil War escalated to a new level of horror.

Click here for more information about Hell Itself

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Hurricane from the Heavens: The Battle of Cold Harbor, May 26-June 5, 1864
by Daniel T. Davis and Phillip S. Greenwalt

HurricaneMay 1864 had witnessed near-constant combat between his Army of the Potomac and the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. Grant, unlike his predecessors, had not relented in his pounding of the Confederates. The armies clashed in the Wilderness and at Spotsylvania Courthouse and along the North Anna River. Whenever combat failed to break the Confederates, Grant resorted to maneuver. “I propose to fight it out along this line if it takes all summer,” Grant vowed—and it had.

The stakes had grown enormous. Grant’s staggering casualty lists had driven Northern morale to his lowest point of the war. Would Lee’s men hold on to defend their besieged capital—and, in doing so, prolong the war until Northern will collapsed entirely? Or would another round of hard fighting finally be enough to crush Lee’s army? Could Grant push through and end the war?

Click here for more information on Hurricane from the Heavens

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The Last Days of Stonewall Jackson
by Chris Mackowski and Kristopher D. White

LDJ-coverECWS

May 1863. The Civil War was in its third spring, and Confederate Lt. Gen. Thomas Jonathan Jackson stood at the peak of his fame. He had arisen from obscurity to become “Old Stonewall,” adored across the South and feared and respected throughout the North. On the night of May 2, however, just hours after Jackson executed the most audacious maneuver of his career and delivered a crushing blow against an unsuspecting Union army at Chancellorsville, disaster struck.

The Last Days of Stonewall Jackson recounts the events of that fateful night—considered one of the most pivotal moments of the war—and the tense vigil that ensued as Jackson struggled with a foe even he could not defeat.

Click here for more information on The Last Days of Stonewall Jackson  ·  Click here to order

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The Last Road North: A Guide to the Gettysburg Campaign, 1863
by Robert Orrison and Dan Welch

Layout 1“I thought my men were invincible,” admitted Robert E. Lee. A string of battlefield victories through 1862 had culminated in the spring of 1863 with Lee’s greatest victory yet: the battle of Chancellorsville. Propelled by the momentum of that supreme moment, confident in the abilities of his men, Lee decided to once more take the fight to the Yankees and launched this army on another invasion of the North.

An appointment with destiny awaited in the little Pennsylvania college town of Gettysburg.

Based on the Civil War Trails system, and packed with dozens of lesser-known sites related to the Gettysburg Campaign, The Last Road North: A Guide to the Gettysburg Campaign offers the ultimate Civil War road trip.

Click here for more information on The Last Road North.

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A Long and Bloody Task: The Atlanta Campaign, from Dalton through Kennesaw Mountain to the Chattahooche River, May 5-July 18, 1864
by Steve Davis

Layout 1Spring of 1864 brought a whole new war to the Western Theater, with new commanders and what would become a new style of warfare. Federal armies, perched in Chattanooga, Tennessee, after their stunning victories there the previous fall, poised on the edge of Georgia for the first time in the war.

Atlanta sat in the far distance. Major General William T. Sherman, newly elevated to command the Union’s western armies, eyed it covetously―the South’s last great untouched prize. “Get into the interior of the enemy’s country as far as you can, inflicting all the damage you can against their War resources,” his superior, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, ordered.

Click here for more information.

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No Turning Back: A Guide to the 1864 Overland Campaign, from the Wilderness to Cold Harbor, May 4-June 13, 1864
by Robert M. Dunkerly, Donald C. Pfanz, and David R. Ruth

Layout 1“There will be no turning back,” said Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. It was May, 1864. The Civil War had dragged into its fourth spring. It was time to end things, Grant resolved, once and for all.

With the Union Army of the Potomac as his sledge, Grant crossed the Rapidan River, intending to draw the Army of Northern Virginia into one final battle. Short of that, he planned “to hammer continuously against the armed forces of the enemy and his resources, until by mere attrition, if no other way, there should be nothing left to him…”

Almost immediately, though, Robert E. Lee’s Confederates brought Grant to bay in the thick tangle of the Wilderness. Rather than retreat, as other army commanders had done in the past, Grant out maneuvered Lee, swinging left and south.

There was, after all, no turning back.

Click here for more information on No Turning Back

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Out Flew the Sabres: The Battle of Brandy Station, June 9, 1863 

by Eric J. Wittenberg and Daniel T. Davis

Out Flew the Sabres-coverOne day. Fourteen hours. Twelve thousand Union cavalrymen against 9,000 of their Confederate counterparts―with three thousand Union infantry thrown in for good measure. Amidst the thunder of hooves and the clashing of sabers, they slugged it out across the hills and dales of Culpepper County, Virginia.

And it escalated into the largest cavalry battle ever fought on the North American continent.

Click here for more information on Out Flew the Sabres.

 

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A Season of Slaughter: The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, May 8021, 1864
by Chris Mackowski and Kristopher D. White

Layout 1

“I intend to fight it out along this line if it takes all summer,” Union commander Ulysses S. Grant wrote to Washington after he’d opened his Overland Campaign in the Spring of 1864. His resolve entirely changed the face of warfare.

Grant, the irresistible force, hammering with his overwhelming numbers and unprecedented power, versus Lee, the immovable object, hunkered down behind the most formidable defensive works yet seen on the continent—Spotsylvania Court House represents a chess match of immeasurable stakes between two master opponents.

Click here for more information on A Season of Slaughter  ·  Click here to order

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Simply Murder: The Battle of Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862
by Chris Mackowski and Kristopher D. White

Layout 1

They melted like snow on the ground, one officer said—wave after wave of Federal soldiers charging uphill across an open muddy plain. Confederates, fortified behind a stone wall along a sunken road, poured a hail of lead into them as they charged . . . and faltered . . . and died.

“I had never before seen fighting like that, nothing approaching it in terrible uproar and destruction,” said one eyewitness to the slaughter. “It is only murder now.”

Click here for more info on Simply Murder  ·  Click here to order

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Strike Them A Blow! Battle Along the North Anna, May 21-25, 1864
by Chris Mackowski

Layout 1For sixteen days the armies had grappled—a grueling horror-show of nonstop battle, march, and maneuver that stretched through May of 1864. Federal commander Ulysses S. Grant had resolved to destroy his Confederate adversaries through attrition if by no other means. He would just keep at them until he used them up.

Meanwhile, Grant’s Confederate counterpart, Robert E. Lee, looked for an opportunity to regain the offensive initiative. “We must strike them a blow,” he told his lieutenants.

The toll on both armies was staggering.

Click here for more information on Strike Them a Blow.

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To the Bitter End: Appomattox, Bennett Place, and the Surrenders of the Confederacy
by Robert M. Dunkerly

Layout 1Across the Confederacy, determination remained high through the winter of 1864 into the new year. Yet ominous signs were everywhere. The peace conference had failed. Large areas were overrun, the armies could not stop Union advances, the economy was in shambles, and industry and infrastructure were crumbling—the Confederacy could not make, move, or maintain anything. No one knew what the future held, but uncertainty.

Collectively and individually, civilians and soldiers, generals and governors, resolved to fight to the bitter end.

Click here for more information on To the Bitter End.

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That Furious Struggle: Chancellorsville and the High Tide of the Confederacy, May 1-4, 1863
by Chris Mackowski and Kristopher D. White

Layout 1It has been called Robert E. Lee’s supreme moment: riding into the Chancellorsville clearing . . . the mansion itself aflame in the background . . . his gunpowder-smeared soldiers crowding around him, hats off, cheering wildly.

After one of the most audacious gambits of the war, Lee and his men had defeated a foe more than two and half times their size. The Federal commander, “Fighting Joe” Hooker, had boasted days earlier that his plans were perfect—yet his army had crumbled, and Hooker himself had literally been knocked senseless.

History would remember the battle of Chancellorsville as “Lee’s Greatest Victory.”

But Confederate fortunes had reached their high tide.

Click here for more information on That Furious Struggle.

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A Want of Vigilance
by Bill Backus and Robert Orrison

Vigilance-coverThe months after Gettysburg had hardly been quiet—filled with skirmishes, cavalry clashes, and plenty of marching. Nonetheless, the Union commander, Maj. Gen. George Gordon Meade, had yet to come to serious blows with his Confederate counterpart, Gen. Robert E. Lee.

“Lee is undoubtedly bullying you,” one of Meade’s superiors goaded.

Lee’s army—severely bloodied at Gettysburg—did not quite have the offensive capability it once possessed, yet Lee’s aggressive nature could not be quelled. He looked for the chance to strike out at Meade.

In mid-October, 1863, both men shifted their armies into motion.

Click here for more information on A Want of Vigilance.

8 Responses to The Emerging Civil War Series

  1. Pingback: BOOK REVIEW: “The Last Days of Stonewall Jackson” | Civil War Diary

  2. Sylvia says:

    Is there a list of the entire series? I would like to begin purchasing them from the first book.

    • • Grant’s Last Battle: The Story Behind the Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant by Chris Mackowski (July 2015)
      • Strike Them a Blow: Battle Along the North Anna River, May 21-May 26, 1884 by Chris Mackowski (June 2015)
      • Fight Like the Devil: The First Day at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863 by Chris Mackowski, Kristopher D. White, and Daniel T. Davis (April 2015)
      • To the Bitter End: Appomattox, Bennett Place, and the Surrenders of the Confederacy by Robert M. Dunkerly (March 2015)
      • Dawn of Victory: Breakthrough at Petersburg, March 25-April 2, 1865 by Edward S. Alexander (March 2015)
      • Calamity in Carolina: The Battles of Averasboro and Bentonville, March 1865 by Daniel T. Davis and Phillip S. Greenwalt (March 2015)
      • That Furious Struggle: Chancellorsville and the High Tide of the Confederacy, May 1-5, 1863 by Chris Mackowski and Kristopher D. White (August 2014)—Now in a second edition
      • Hurricane from the Heavens: The Battle of Cold Harbor, May 26-June 5, 1864 by Daniel T. Davis and Phillip S. Greenwalt (April 2014)—Now going into a second edition
      • No Turning Back: A Guide to the 1864 Overland Campaign by Robert M. Dunkerly, Donald C. Pfanz, and David R. Ruth (April 2014)—Now in a second printing
      • Bloody Autumn: The Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864 by Daniel T. Davis and Phillip S. Greenwalt (Fall 2013)—Now in a second edition
      • Bushwhacking on a Grand Scale: The Battle of Chickamauga, Sept. 18-20, 1863 by William Lee White (Sept. 2013) —Now going into a second edition
      • A Season of Slaughter: The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, May 8-21, 1864 by Chris Mackowski and Kristopher D. White (May 2013)—Now in a second edition
      • The Last Days of Stonewall Jackson: The Mortal Wounding of the Confederacy’s Greatest Icon by Chris Mackowski and Kristopher D. White (May 2013)—Now in a second edition
      • Simply Murder: The Battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862 by Chris Mackowski and Kristopher D. White (December 2012)—Now in a second edition

  3. Pingback: A Season of Slaughter | Student of the American Civil War

  4. Pingback: Civil War Book Review: Dawn of Victory: Breakthrough at Petersburg, March 25-April 2, 1865 — TOCWOC - A Civil War Blog

  5. pde21 says:

    What books research etc would you recommend to help me understand what events and circumstances caused the Civil War? I have been reading “The Impending Crisis, America before the Civil War 1848 to1861”, by David M Potter.

    • William Baltz says:

      A Disease of the Public Mind by Thomas Fleming (2014). An even-handed account of how when the extremes of an argument dominate the narrative conflict replaces resolution. Addresses the history of the slavery in the in the New World while exploring the politics, morality and economics of the Peculiar Institution. Well-researched, readable, most importantly not agenda-driven thesis. Though certainly not a definitive work, it certainly is a worthwhile and honest offering of the complex issue and its contributions to the Civil War.

  6. rarerootbeer says:

    This is a great Civil War series. All that is missing is root beer.

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