Tag Archives: Emancipation Proclamation

“Thenceforward and Forever Free”: The Emancipation Proclamation as a Turning Point

We are pleased to welcome Dan Vermilya, author of the upcoming Emerging Civil war Series book That Field of Blood: The Battle of Antietam. Dan, a historian at Gettysburg National Military Park, is also a licensed battlefield guide at Antietam … Continue reading

Posted in Engaging the Civil War Series, Lincoln, Politics, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Battlefield Markers & Monuments: Emancipation Memorial in Lincoln Park, Washington D.C.

An important monument of President Abraham Lincoln sits in Lincoln Park, a park in the Capitol Hill section of Washington, D.C. This statue is seen by thousands of people each day – the Emancipation Memorial. I wonder about how many … Continue reading

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“If We Fail Now the North Has No Hope:” The Antietam Campaign of 1862

The Fifth Annual Emerging Civil War Symposium, August 3-5, 2018, will focus on Turning Points of the American Civil War. We were excited to announce that our Keynote Speaker will be retired Gettysburg National Military Park Supervisory Historian Scott Hartwig. … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Arms & Armaments, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Books & Authors, Campaigns, Common Soldier, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Lincoln, Memory, Monuments, National Park Service, Symposium | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

September 16, 1862: The Night Of No Return

Civil War soldiers vividly remembered, and recalled, certain days of their military careers, both the highs and lows, the good ones and the bad ones. For those soldier participants in the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, the September 17, … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Memory | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

ECW Digital Shorts – The Union’s Great Crisis

This fall Emerging Civil War rolled out a soft release of three titles to kick off a new series called the Digital Shorts. These essays consist of extended blog posts, transcribed presentations, and “deleted scenes”–i.e., submissions that while well-written were … Continue reading

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Black Confederates

Today we are pleased to welcome back guest author Sam Smith The Civil War was a fiery prism at the center of American society. Every life entered the prism at its own angle and was refracted in its own way. … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Armies, Civil War Events, Common Soldier, Lincoln, Memory, Politics, USCT | Tagged , , , , | 25 Comments

What ESPN Classic Teaches Us About Civil War History

Hindsight is always 20/20. We look back at historic events possessing information not available to the participants. In hindsight, things that were important at the time have faded while others assume a larger importance. I suggest we need to try … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Books & Authors, Campaigns, Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Politics, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Williamsburg’s Dividing Line

Today, we are pleased to welcome back guest author Drew Gruber. As Rockefeller’s team began the great restoration of Williamsburg to its appearance in the colonial era, most of the town’s newer structures were razed. However, 88 original 18th century … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Cavalry, Civil War Events, Civilian, Common Soldier, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“I Heard the Bells On Christmas Day…”—Repost

The following is a post that originally ran on December 13, 2011: The Christmas carol “I Heard the Bells On Christmas Day” was originally a poem. Written by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, it was arranged and set to music by John … Continue reading

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Eastern Theater versus Western Theater: Where the Civil War Was Won and Lost: Part Five

Part five in a series. This series was put together from one of my extended graduate school research papers. The sources used were the current research between 2007-2008, obviously the historiography of the Civil War expands on a monthly basis, … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Memory, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment