Saving History Saturday: American Battlefield Trust to Save 42 Acres at Stones River

From December 31, 1862 to January 2, 1863, 24,000 men were either killed, wounded, or missing in the fields just outside of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. By percentage, the Battle of Stones River was war’s bloodiest. Today, this critical battle – marked by suffering and devastation – is one of the most threatened due to its proximity to booming Nashville. The need for preservation is critical.

The official map of Stones River on January 2, 1863 from the American Battlefield Trust. The yellow-colored section is the target property. Courtesy of the American Battlefield Trust.

The American Battlefield Trust just announced its latest campaign to save 42 acres of hallowed ground at the Stones River battlefield. The target property sits between the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad and Stones River. According to the Trust, this is one of the largest unprotected tracts of hallowed ground and will tie two other protected tracts of land together. The Trust just needs to raise $170,000.

But, what specifically occurred on these 42 acres?

We will have a series of posts pertaining to this hallowed tract of land, including a history of preservation at Stones River and why this land is vital to understanding the battle.

To get involved with the American Battlefield Trust’s efforts, please click here.

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3 Responses to Saving History Saturday: American Battlefield Trust to Save 42 Acres at Stones River

  1. Rhea Cole says:

    I have sent in my contribution. 42 acres might not sound like a lot of land. I am a decades long living history volunteer ar Stones River National Battlefield. This plot of land will link the two sections of the Battlefield already preserved by the Park Service. I cannot overemphasize how this plot will enhance your ability to walk the ground & understand the awful fate that befell The Orphan Brigade during Breckinridge’s attack on the third day of the battle. It took a tornado, an act of God, to make this opportunity possible. It is now up to us to make it a reality.

    • John Foskett says:

      An excellent point. Just looking at the map shows that this parcel is in the heart of the historical battlefield.

  2. Robert Denney says:

    Just dropped my contribution in the mail. Looking forward to walking the ground when it is all connected.

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