Author Archives: Chris Kolakowski

USS Mississippi Visits Okinawa

In 1853, Commodore Matthew Perry arrived in the Far East to open up relations with Japan. His first flagship was USS Mississippi, a side-wheel steamer. Before going to Tokyo, Perry stopped at Okinawa to deal with the Okinawan king regarding … Continue reading

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Primary Sources: Thoughts and Favorites

A primary source is defined as one produced by an eyewitness to an event offering their recollections. Some primary sources provide just basic facts with limited additional details. Other sources, like battle reports, provide more details but often offer little … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Primary Sources, Trans-Mississippi, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Final Legacy of the Civil War Generation

The Civil War reshaped and defined the United States in ways still very visible today. That is enough for one generation, right? Yet the Civil War generation also led the United States throughout the late 19th Century of industrialization, expansion, … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Ties to the War, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

A Father’s Legacy: Simon Bolivar Buckner Sr. and Jr.

On January 8, 1914, Simon Bolivar Buckner died. He was the last surviving Confederate lieutenant general, and was buried in Frankfort, Kentucky’s cemetery with considerable ceremony. Born in 1823, in Munfordville, Kentucky, he was named in honor of Simon Bolivar, … Continue reading

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Armistice Day at 100

One hundred years ago today, at 11 AM local time, the guns on the Western Front fell silent as World War I’s armistice took effect. World War I remade the world and set the course for the 20th Century. Its … Continue reading

Posted in Ties to the War | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Railroads: The Louisville and Nashville Railroad

It is often underappreciated how the Louisville & Nashville Railroad’s status impacted the operations of Major General W.S. Rosecrans and the Army of the Cumberland. I discuss it in this except from my book about Stones River and Tullahoma: Throughout … Continue reading

Posted in Campaigns, Weapons, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Two Terraced Cemeteries

There is a terraced cemetery overlooking Fredericksburg, Virginia. Over 15,000 U.S. personnel are buried there, making it one of the largest cemeteries outside of Arlington in the National Cemetery System. Many of the men on that hill died trying to … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Memory, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Delhi and British Monuments

Bert Dunkerly recently posted about monuments in Eastern Europe. At the end of his post, he stated, I offer these thoughts not necessarily to promote or condone what has been done there, but simply to highlight another perspective. It is a … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Monuments | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

A Picture on Nehru’s Wall

I just got back from a fantastic two weeks in India. Among the sites I visited was the Nehru Museum in New Delhi. Before India’s independence on 15 August 1947, the building was residence of British Commander in Chief India. … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Federal, Lincoln, Ties to the War | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

ECW Weekender: The MacArthur Memorial

In the heart of downtown Norfolk stands the former Norfolk City Hall. Opened in 1850, in May 1862 Norfolk’s mayor surrendered to the Union Army on its front steps. Today, it is the resting place of one of America’s most … Continue reading

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