Tag Archives: New Orleans

Purge of the Second Louisiana Native Guards

Sometimes courage and leadership among military officers lies not in leading a battlefield charge, but challenging injustice directly. Such leadership occurred by the line officers of the Louisiana Native Guards, the largest concentration of African American military officers in the … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Federal, Regiments, USCT | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Fallen Leaders – Colonel Isaac Seymour, 6th Louisiana Infantry, Part 2

Read Part 1 HERE General Thomas Jackson’s tardy arrival to the Seven Days Battle meant that the 6th Louisiana Volunteers and Colonel Isaac Seymour (now in command of the entire Louisiana Brigade) missed the opening engagement at Beaver Dam Creek. … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Confederate, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Fallen Leaders: Colonel Isaac Seymour, 6th Louisiana Infantry, Part 1

The loss of a leader had the potential to impact the morale of the soldiers below them. It had less to do with how important they were to the success of the battle or what rank they held, and more … Continue reading

Posted in Common Soldier, Leadership--Confederate, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Untangling the Marmillions, Part 2

Read Part 1 HERE Naturally, with all these V.B.s, P.B.s, and E.B.s floating around, it makes research difficult, if not impossible to deduct who is who. For instance, a “V.B. Marmillion” was listed along with many other planters in St. … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Slavery, USCT | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Untangling the Marmillions, Part 1

On January 30, 1864, Harper’s Weekly published a set of accounts from formerly enslaved blacks from New Orleans. Emancipated by Benjamin Butler during the Federal occupation of the town, these individuals came forward to give their testimonies to the atrocities … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Civilian, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Echoes of Reconstruction: Roundup of Recent Books

ECW is pleased to welcome back Patrick Young, author of The Reconstruction Era blog Many of us expanded our reading during the lonely days of the Pandemic by taking old books off the shelves to read anew. I just settled in with … Continue reading

Posted in Book Review, Memory, Politics, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

On the Eve of War: New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans is often called America’s most unique city. If not as true today, it certainly was in 1861. One major reason is no other major city in the country was acquired by America with a non-Anglo Catholic culture fully … Continue reading

Posted in 160th Anniversary | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

The Persistence of the Mardi Gras Spirit in Civil War New Orleans

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest author Neil P. Chatelain… Nothing embodies New Orleans more than Mardi Gras. Crowds throng parades, balls, and costumed parties, marking final celebrations before the Catholic season of Lent. Organizations host parades, customizing throws of … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Holidays | Tagged , , , | 5 Comments

“Were you ever at Camp Moore?” – Louisiana’s Largest Training Camp – Part II

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest author Sheritta Bitikofer… Part II of II…see Part I here Though it wasn’t the only training camp in southeast Louisiana (Chalmette and Benjamin/Jerusalem, among others) Camp Moore continued to be a major hub for … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Common Soldier | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

“Were you ever at Camp Moore?” – Louisiana’s Largest Training Camp – Part I

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest author Sheritta Bitikofer… Part I of II…see Part II here Nestled deep in the woods of St. Helena Parish, along the New Orleans & Jackson Railroad, seventy-five miles north of the famous Crescent City, … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Common Soldier | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments