Tag Archives: New Orleans

The Rise and Fall of W. Irving Hodgson

The most famed artillery unit of the American Civil War was New Orleans’ Washington Artillery. Founded in 1838, they had taken part in the Mexican-American War but did not see combat. Founded as a strictly Anglo-American outfit, by the 1850s … Continue reading

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The Confederate Navy’s Order of Battle at New Orleans: A Reflection of Political Tensions

ECW welcomes back guest author Neil P. Chatelain. The ECW post on September 27, 2018 titled “Order of Battle – Why Those Lists Matter” reminded me of my own research, and I began doing what historians do: using thoughts and … Continue reading

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The Confederate Veteran and the Serial Killer

Most of New Orleans stands on the east bank of the Mississippi River. Today, the opposite side – a collection of suburbs – is known as the West Bank. However, for a long time it had the reputation as a  … Continue reading

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Railroads: “I took to it quite naturally.” Beauregard as Railroad Executive

In 1865 P.G.T. Beauregard entered upon his next act of life widowed, defeated, and without much money. Beauregard returned to New Orleans, which had escaped the destruction that laid waste other cities. It was still a premiere commercial center and … Continue reading

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Thoughts on “Madame Castel’s Lodger”

New Orleans has produced a fair number of notable authors, in particular George Washington Cable, John Kennedy Toole, and Anne Rice. However, it is more famous as the inspiration for writers of the first rank: Thomas “Tennessee” Williams III, William … Continue reading

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Polk’s Resting Place

Leonidas Polk remains something of an elusive figure to military historians. He owed his high rank to his friendship with Jefferson Davis. But Polk could have risen up the officer ranks on his own. He was charismatic, well-connected, wealthy, and … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Confederate, Memory, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , | 30 Comments

William Freret: From Folly to War to Success

William Freret Jr. enjoyed one of the most unusual careers during the Civil War, including brief service in the Washington Artillery. He also had one of the most successful postbellum professional careers; by the time of his death, he was … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Artillery, Trans-Mississippi | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Other Beauregard Monument

Welcome back, guest author Sean Michael Chick For Civil War historians living outside of Louisiana, Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard is a colorful figure. For many, he is an underrated commander. For others, a figure who is exotic and comical, particularly … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Monuments, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Year In Review 2017: #9

Reflecting some of the historical controversies in 2017 and the discussion of monuments, our ninth most-read blog post of 2017 was written by a guest author. He shared about monuments in New Orleans and how that city faces the challenges … Continue reading

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Failed Ironclads: CSS Mississippi and CSS Louisiana at New Orleans

In October 1861, the skeletons of two strange iron monsters began to emerge from the Mississippi bank at Jefferson City, just north of New Orleans. They would become the CSS Mississippi and CSS Louisiana. Confederate Navy Secretary Stephen Mallory had … Continue reading

Posted in Arms & Armaments, Battles, Emerging Civil War, Navies | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment