The Lego Battle of Antietam

Kris White passed this along to me the other day and it was too good not to share: The battle of Antietam in Lego form.

The video is just part one of two and covers the fighting around Dunker Church and the West Woods. Part two has yet to be released.

I admit, seeing the Civil War in Lego form was initially disconcerting, but the production quality was so high, it won me over (despite the annoying commercial built into the middle of it). Not only did the produces use Legos in a lot of surprising ways, the director chose camera angles that went above and beyond. This take on the war won’t be for everyone, but I have to say, it was incredibly creative.

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4 Responses to The Lego Battle of Antietam

  1. Bob Lapolla says:

    I don’t think this is an appropriate subject for fun. But the narration is accurate so maybe some history can be learned by Lego fans. What is the world coming to?

  2. I think that is more about how Legos has broadened so much. My kids now adults, still do some Lego things. There are truly Legos for everything. I guess it would get into history at some point.
    Tom

  3. I think this was rather clever. Not just in the production, but for the idea that kids will be more drawn to this format of education. There are way too many Lego movies to acknowledge, and presenting history in a similar way can be a good way to get kids interested.

  4. Henry Fleming says:

    Cute, maybe it will spur some kids to have future interest in the subject matter, that would be nice. Dunker Church scored on the cute meter. On the other hand, Antietam was the bloodiest day of the war, where were the headless Lego dudes, with Lego red paint spurting out of vacant necks? Lego smoke?? One dude falls at a time? How about a whole row of lego’s going down with one left standing? Maybe some half burned Lego’s or some Lego arms and legs strewn about a Lego surgery tent, with the sound of Lego terrorfied screams, curses, calls to family and prayers. Sorry, everyone’s a critic, right? Much better production than I could have done, and if Lego’s are for adults, much different than I would have done.

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