For Want of Safe Evacuation

While working on my thesis recently, I was reading Medical Recollections of the Army of the Potomac by Dr. Letterman. He offered a brief note about the wounding of Stonewall Jackson at the battle of Chancellorsville:

The entire field was brilliantly illuminated by the incessant flashing of many guns, and the whole region resounded with the deafening roar of artillery. During the night Lieutenant-General Jackson was accidentally wounded by some of his own men, and shortly afterwards died. In him we lost a formidable enemy, and the rebellion a powerful supporter to that cause:
 
‘A blast from out his bugle horn
were worth ten thousand men.’
It is interesting that Letterman was working to make things like stretcher travel safe for a soldier, yet the lack of that very same thing was a major part of what caused Jackson’s death.

About Meg Groeling

CW Historian
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